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Tours
CITY TOUR
TERMESSOS
DEMRE MYRA KEKOVA
TURKISH NIGHT
AQUALAND
QUAD SAFARI
DIVING
BOAT TOUR
JEEP SAFARI
RAFTING
CAPPADOCIA
PAMUKKALE
FIRE OF ANATOLIA
PERGE ASPENDOS SİDE
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Private Tours
TERMESSOS EVDİRHAN DÜDEN WATERFALL
SAGALASSOS-ANTIOKEIA-EFLATUN PINAR
PERGE ASPENDOS KURŞUNLU WATERFALL
PERGE ASPENDOS SİDE MANAVGAT WATERFALL
DEMRE - MYRA - KEKOVA
KONYA KAPADOKYA (2 DAY H/B)
PAMUKKALE EFES APHRODİAS (2 DAY H/B)
ALANYA
SAGALASSOS
PHASELİS OLYMPOS ÇIRALI (CHİMERA)
PAMUKKALE
CITY TOUR
KARPUZKALDIRAN DÜDEN KURŞUNLU
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Hotels
 
 
 
ALANYA
From : ANTALYA
at : 08:00 HOTEL
return : 18:00 HOTEL
Price : 1-3 PAX 325€ + PP 40€

- Departure ( Departure time is up to customer. Proposed time is at 07:00 a.m)

 

- Damlataş Cave , Alanya Castle, Kızılkule

 

- Lunch break near Dim Brook

 

- Back to Antalya. Transfer to the hotels

 

 

ALANYA (ALAIYE)

Alanya (pronounced [?'l?nj?]), formerly Alaiye, is a seaside resort city and district of Antalya Province in the Mediterranean Region of Turkey, 120 kilometres (75 mi) from the city of Antalya. On the southern coast of Turkey, the municipal district, including the city centre, has close to 400,000 inhabitants. The population is almost entirely of Anatolian origin, but is home to around 10,000 European residents.

Because of its natural strategic position on a small peninsula into the Mediterranean Sea, below the Taurus Mountains, Alanya has been a local stronghold for many Mediterranean-based empires, including the Ptolemaic, Seleucid, Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman Empires. Alanya's greatest political importance came in the Middle Ages, with the Seljuk Sultanate of Rûm under the rule of Alaeddin Keykubad I, from whom the city derives its name. His building campaign resulted in many of the city's landmarks, such as the Kızıl Kule (Red Tower), Tersane (Shipyard), and Alanya Castle.

The relatively moderate Mediterranean climate, natural attractions, and historic heritage makes Alanya a popular destination for tourism, and responsible for nine percent of Turkey's tourism sector and thirty percent of foreign purchases of real estate in Turkey. Tourism has risen since 1958 to become the dominant industry in the city, resulting in a corresponding increase in city population. Warm-weather sporting events and cultural festivals take place annually in Alanya. Mayor Hasan Sipahioğlu, of the Justice and Development Party, has led the city since 1999.

 

History

Although first fortified in the Hellenistic period following the area's conquest by Alexander the Great, the castle rock was likely inhabited under the Hittites and the Persian Empire. Finds in the nearby Kadrini cave indicate occupation during the Paleolithic era as far back as 20,000 BC. A Phoenician language tablet found in the district dates to 625 BC, and the city is specifically mentioned in the 4th-century BC Greek geography manuscript, the periplus of Pseudo-Scylax. Alexander's successors left the area to Ptolemy I Soter after 323 BC. His dynasty maintained loose control over the mainly Isaurian population, and the port became a popular refuge for Mediterranean pirates. The city resisted Antiochus III the Great of the neighboring Seleucid kingdom in 199 BC, but was loyal to the pirate Diodotus Tryphon when he seized the Seleucid crown from 142 to 138 BC. His rival Antiochus VII Sidetes completed work in 137 BC on a new castle and port, begun under Diodotus Tryphon.

The Roman Republic fought Cilician pirates in 102 BC, when Marcus Antonius the Orator established a proconsulship in nearby Side, and in 78 BC under Servilius Vatia, who moved on the Isaurian tribes. The period of piracy in Alanya finally ended after the city's incorporation into the Pamphylia province by Pompey in 67 BC, with the Battle of Korakesion fought in the city's harbor. Isaurian banditry remained an issue under the Romans, and the tribes revolted in the fourth and fifth centuries AD, with the largest rebellion being from 404 to 408. After the Roman Empire's collapse and split, the city remained under Byzantine influence, becoming a suffragan of Side, in the metropolis of Pamphylia Prima. Islam arrived in the 7th century with Arab raids, which led to the construction of new fortifications. 681 marked the end of a bishopric in Alanya, although St. Peter of Atroa may have taken refuge here from iconoclastic persecution in the early 9th century. The area fell from Byzantine control after the Battle of Manzikert in 1071 to tribes of Seljuk Turks, only to be returned in 1120 by John II Komnenos.

Following the Fourth Crusade's attack on the Byzantines, the Christian Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia periodically held the port, and it was from an Armenian, Kir Fard, that the Turks took lasting control in 1221 when the Anatolian Seljuk Sultan Alaeddin Keykubad I captured it, assigning the former ruler, whose daughter he married, to the governance of the city of Akşehir. Seljuk rule saw the golden age of the city, and it can be considered the winter capital of their empire. Building projects, including the twin citadel, city walls, arsenal, and Kızıl Kule, made it an important seaport for western Mediterranean trade, particularly with Ayyubid Egypt and the Italian city-states. Alaeddin Keykubad I also constructed numerous gardens and pavilions outside the walls, and many of his works can still be found in the city. These were likely financed by his own treasury and by the local emirs, and constructed by the contractor Abu 'Ali al-Kattani al-Halabi. Alaeddin Keykubad I's son, Sultan Gıyaseddin Keyhüsrev II, continued the building campaign with a new cistern in 1240.

At the Battle of Köse Dağ in 1242, the Mongol hordes broke the Seljuk hegemony in Anatolia. Alanya was then subject to a series of invasions from Anatolian Turkish Beyliks. In 1293, the Karamanoğlu dynasty took control after Mecdüddin Mahmud conquered the city, but their rule was intermittent. Lusignans from Cyprus briefly overturned the then ruling Hamidoğlu Beylik in 1371. The Karamanoğlu sold the city in 1427 for 5,000 gold coins to the Mamluks of Egypt for a period before General Gedik Ahmed Pasha in 1471 incorporated it into the growing Ottoman Empire. The city was made a capital of a local sanjak in the eyalet of Içel. The Ottomans extended their rule in 1477 when they brought the main shipping trade, lumber, then mostly done by Venetians, under the government monopoly. On September 6, 1608, the city rebuffed an naval attack by the Order of Saint Stephen from the Republic of Venice.

Trade in the region was negatively impacted by the development of an oceanic route from Europe around Africa to India, and in the tax registers of the late sixteenth century, Alanya failed to qualify as an urban center. In 1571 the Ottomans designated the city as part of the newly conquered province of Cyprus. The conquest further diminished the economic importance of Alanya's port. Traveler Evliya Çelebi visited the city in 1671/1672, and wrote on the preservation of Alanya Castle, but also on the dilapidation of Alanya's suburbs. The city was reassigned in 1864 under Konya, and in 1868 under Antalya, as it is today. During the 18th and 19th centuries numerous villas were built in the city by Ottoman nobility, and civil construction continued under the local dynastic Karamanid authorities. Bandits again became common across Antalya Province in the mid-nineteenth century.

After World War I, Alanya was nominally partitioned in the 1917 Agreement of St.-Jean-de-Maurienne to Italy, before returning to the Turkish Republic in 1923 under the Treaty of Lausanne. Like others in this region, the city suffered heavily following the war and the population exchanges that heralded the Turkish Republic, when many of the city's Christians resettled in Nea Ionia, outside Athens. The Ottoman census of 1893 listed the number of Greeks in the city at 964 out of a total population of 37,914. Tourism in the region started among Turks who came to Alanya in the 1960s for the alleged healing properties of Damlataş Cave, and later the access provided by Antalya Airport in 1998 allowed the town to grow into an international resort. Strong population growth through the 1990s was a result of immigration to the city, and has driven a rapid modernization of the infrastructure.

ALANYA CASTLE

The Citadel of Alanya, the walls of which are nearly 6.5 kilometres long, is on a peninsula whose height is up to 250 metres from the sea level. Although the settlement on Alanya peninsula, also known as Kandeleri, dates back to the Hellenistic Era, its cultural characteristics that can be seen today are thanks to Selcuks of the 13th century.

The citadel was constructed on the demand of the Sultan of Selcuks, Alaaddin Keykubat, who conquered and had the city rebuilt in 1221. The citadel has 83 towers and 140 bastions. Nearly 400 cisterns were built to supply the city surrounded by walks in the medieval times with water. Some of the cisterns are still used today. The walls were built in a well-planned manner; downwards to Ehmedek, İçkale, Adama Atacağı, the upper part of Cilvarda Bay, Arap Evliyası Burcu and Esat Burcu, then through the gun house and the dockyard and they end up in Kızılkule-İçkale, an open-air museum, is located at the peak of the peninsula. Alaaddin Keykubat, the Sultan, had his palace built there.

Today the citadel is still inhabited by people. In front of wooden and brick houses of historical value, silk and cotton are woven, white gourds are painted in different figures and authentic meals are served in small gardens. There are also restaurants and cafés on the way to the citadel and on its sides overlooking the harbour. The citadel is open to traffic. It takes you nearly an hour to walk to the citadel.

Red Tower

It's in the harbour. The octagonal shaped building that's the symbol of the city is a work by Selcuks of the 13th century. It was built in 1226 by Ebu Ali Rehç el Kettani, a master builder from Aleppo and had built the citadel of Sinop before on the demand of Alaaddin Keykubat, the Sultan of Selcuks. It was made of red bricks, the upper parts of which had been fired, since stone blocks were difficult to lift at a certain height, thus it was given the name of Kızılkule (Red Tower). Marble blocks of the antiquity are seen in the walls of the citadel. The height of the tower that is octagonal in shape is 33 meters and it is 29 meters in diameter, its each wall is 12.5 metres long. There are five floors, including the ground floor. You can go to the top of the tower with the help of stone stairs that are high-spaced and have 85 steps. Sunlight coming from the top of the tower even reaches the first floor. There is a cistern in the middle of the tower. The tower was built in order to protect the harbour and the dockyard from naval attacks and was used for military purposes for centuries. Being restored in 1950s, the tower was opened to visitors in 1979, and its first floor began to be used as the museum of Ethnography.

 

DAMLATAŞ CAVE

Damlataş Cave was discovered in 1948 quite by accident while minig for building of the harbour. It is located at the western foot of hold peninsula. There is a 50 m passage at the entrance. After the passage there comes a cylinderical cavity. This leads to the basement of the cave. The stalactite and stalagmites inside the cave were formed in 15 thousand years. Besides its fascinating beauty the cave is famous with its air which is beneficial to asthmatic patients. Following the rumors that asthmatic benefited from breathing the air in the cave, scientists analyzed a sample of the air to verify the fact that the air was indeed beneficial to patients suffering from non-allergic asthme. They found that the air in the cave contains 10 to 12 times more carbon dioxide than normal air and has % 95 humidity. Temperature in the cave is 22 degrees centigrade. Both the radioactivity and ionization in the cave may contribute to the benefits derived from breathing the air in the cave. Entrance is due to payment. There is a small market around and in front of the cave is a beach.

 

DİM BROOK

Dim Brook takes its source from the Taurus and flows to the Mediterranean from the east of Alanya; there are picnic areas on the coast of it which is 15 km inside from the coast of the Mediterranean. In summer the tables of field restaurants under the old plane trees are set in the brook. The guests sit there bare feet in the brook. What's more, authentic tables with cushions are set on the wooden terraces on the slopes close to the brook and by the brook. In some restaurants, tables are on the rafts. The valley covered by forests is cool even in the summer. The commonly preferred dish in this area is usually trout. The trout are kept in the pools in restaurant gardens. They are usually fried, cooked in a crock or grilled. Also, there are some sites in the area proper for mountain-biking and trekking.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Four Seasons

Yeşilbahçe Mah. Metin Kasapoğlu cad.

1452. Sok. Hacı Yusuf Sitesi A Blok No 4/A

ANTALYA-TURKEY

e mail: mehmetyildiz@antalyafourseasons.com